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Instructions

THESE machines will give excellent results if used correctly and with intelligence. PLEASE read these instructions very thoroughly and save them for future perusal. The machine will be supplied to you with a three pin plug already attached.

Barrelling Compounds
The items to be processed are rotated in the barrel in a controlled mixture to give the desired results. Selection of the best compound is to some extent aided by practical tests and the following notes are intended as an initial guide only. The two most used compounds we supply are:

Shapes
These are small angular ceramic type media that can be used with an abrasive for deburring or with a burnishing soap for polishing. In a 3lb barrel use 500g of shapes, a level teaspoonful of abrasive or burnishing soap and half fill the barrel with cold water. Use type ‘A’ abrasive or type ‘A’ burnishing soap.

Steel Pins
These are a mixture of small steel pins and various specially formed small steel media that are probably the most useful of all the barrelling compounds. These are used with barrelbrite, burnishing soap or liquid as follows: - in a 3lb barrel use 500g of Steel pins, a level teaspoonful of burnishing soap and the fill the barrel half full of cold water. Use barrelbrite, ‘B’ burnishing soap or a desert spoon of type `B` liquid.


Opening & Closing the Barrels
The end caps do not screw on but are a snug push fit, when new they can be eased on and off with hot water. Before putting the end caps back onto the barrel leave them to sit in hot water for a couple of minutes. This will soften the end caps and make them easier to push on. As they cool they will create a tight fit around the barrel. When replacing the end caps ensure there are no particles around the rim that could stop them sitting squarely and sealing properly, also release excess air by lifting the side of the end cap as you slide it down – THIS IS IMPORTANT. When lifting barrels filled with compounds etc ALWAYS hold the bottom cap if you hold it vertically as a heavy load could force the bottom cap off with obvious results. If your barrel is leaking it is probably because you have put the end caps on incorrectly.

Object Size/Quantity/Processing Time
Highest efficiency is obtained when the proportion of compound and work items is correctly balanced. Maximum size should be around 30% of barrel volume. As the range of items that can be processed is so large we can only suggest a starting point. For instance, for a selection of intricate coin sized objects in brass, steel or alloy try about ten items or less using steel pins and burnishing soap. Expect a processing time of around 4 to 12 hours. Finish can be varied by altering water content, more water gives a gentler action. If items are very dirty wash out barrel thoroughly and replace burnishing soap  - items will not clean properly in dirty compounds. If extended processing times are used check barrel for gas build-up – this is very unlikely as normally a negative pressure is obtained when working and there is a slight inrush of air when the end caps are removed. However, a gas build up could push the end caps off so be alert to this and check by lifting the side of the cap to reduce pressure.

Work Items with Holes/Threads/Assemblies
Many of the items you will be cleaning will have holes and crevices in them that the compounds will explore when in use. If any of the items have blind holes the compounds (steel pins are especially prone to this) will work their way in and may be very difficult to remove. Insert a plug in to the hole if you expect problems. If the item is threaded it is possible that the thread form may be altered very slightly, if the work is close tolerance protect vulnerable parts as necessary. If you put an assembled item in the barrel it will almost certainly be dismantled by the tumbling action!

Other Barrelling Compounds
Apart from the compounds we have described there are many others that are used for specialist work, for instance sawdust, nylon pellets and wood fragments are used. For cleaning cartridge cases prior to reloading finely broken walnut shells can be used.

Important Initial Operating Tips
When you first use the machine you will probably feel the belt is far too loose, this is not so, it is essential that it runs as loose as possible without slipping and every machine is carefully adjusted and test run. If you tighten it up you can badly damage the motor and rob the machine of power – it MUST be loose. You may also suspect the machine runs rather hot to the touch, again this is a design feature and providing you can comfortably hold your hand on it there is nothing amiss. Do not however place the machine inside a box as it is essential that air can flow around it. We advise placing it on an old tray as this makes any cleaning far easier. One point you will notice is that the barrel will almost certainly move along the rollers until it touches one end of the machine – this is nothing to worry about – you will see there is a stop which the barrel will gently rub against. It is little use trying to tilt the machine in an attempt to stop this barrel movement.

Oiling and Maintenance
The machine is oiled when it leaves our workshops and can be used immediately. However, it will need lubrication whilst in use, proceed as follows:-

EVERY WEEK Apply one drop of oil to the steel shafts of the rollers where they pass through the plastic/brass bearing blocks. This is most important as the most common cause of problems with the barrelling machines of this design is a tight roller which robs the barrel of power.

EVERY MONTH Apply one drop of oil to the motor shaft where it protrudes through the side of the machine (2/3lb) – this will run into the motor bearing. Use motor car grade oil for oiling this machine, lighter grades are not suitable.  

Problem Solving
If barrel does not rotate:
1       Dry thoroughly rollers & barrel
2       If glazed rub lightly with sandpaper
3       Ensure no oil on rollers or barrel
4       Check barrel is not under-loaded or over-loaded

If belt slips:

1       Remove, wash, de-grease, dry thoroughly and replace
2       Replace if worn. Do not tighten

Out of balance barrels:

If barrels are overloaded or very irregular shaped items are being processed it is possible the heavy items will catch on the internal paddles when the barrel rotates, the load on one side will unbalance the barrel and it will not rotate properly. Either reduce the work load or if it is essential that the item is processed it may be worth trying a barrel without paddles which we can supply. The proportion of compounds may then need adjusting for optimum results. Incidentally, a very large number of these machines are used for polishing stones using silicon carbide grits – however the barrel construction is altered in that they have no internal paddles as the action is somewhat different. If you want to use this machine for polishing stones contact us for details on grits, barrels, etc.

For further advice or supplies please contact us at:

Beach Lapidary Ltd 
9 Leigh Road
Cobham
Surrey KT11 2LF
Email: beachlapidary@outlook.com

THESE machines will give excellent results if used correctly and with intelligence. PLEASE read these instructions very thoroughly and save them for future perusal. The machine will be supplied to you with a three pin plug already attached.

Barrelling Compounds
The items to be processed are rotated in the barrel in a controlled mixture to give the desired results. Selection of the best compound is to some extent aided by practical tests and the following notes are intended as an initial guide only. The two most used compounds we supply are:

Shapes
These are small angular ceramic type media that can be used with an abrasive for deburring or with a burnishing soap for polishing. In a 3lb barrel use 500g of shapes, a level teaspoonful of abrasive or burnishing soap and half fill the barrel with cold water. Use type ‘A’ abrasive or type ‘A’ burnishing soap.

Steel Pins
These are a mixture of small steel pins and various specially formed small steel media that are probably the most useful of all the barrelling compounds. These are used with barrelbrite, burnishing soap or liquid as follows: - in a 3lb barrel use 500g of Steel pins, a level teaspoonful of burnishing soap and the fill the barrel half full of cold water. Use barrelbrite, ‘B’ burnishing soap or a desert spoon of type `B` liquid.


Opening & Closing the Barrels
The end caps do not screw on but are a snug push fit, when new they can be eased on and off with hot water. Before putting the end caps back onto the barrel leave them to sit in hot water for a couple of minutes. This will soften the end caps and make them easier to push on. As they cool they will create a tight fit around the barrel. When replacing the end caps ensure there are no particles around the rim that could stop them sitting squarely and sealing properly, also release excess air by lifting the side of the end cap as you slide it down – THIS IS IMPORTANT. When lifting barrels filled with compounds etc ALWAYS hold the bottom cap if you hold it vertically as a heavy load could force the bottom cap off with obvious results. If your barrel is leaking it is probably because you have put the end caps on incorrectly.

Object Size/Quantity/Processing Time
Highest efficiency is obtained when the proportion of compound and work items is correctly balanced. Maximum size should be around 30% of barrel volume. As the range of items that can be processed is so large we can only suggest a starting point. For instance, for a selection of intricate coin sized objects in brass, steel or alloy try about ten items or less using steel pins and burnishing soap. Expect a processing time of around 4 to 12 hours. Finish can be varied by altering water content, more water gives a gentler action. If items are very dirty wash out barrel thoroughly and replace burnishing soap  - items will not clean properly in dirty compounds. If extended processing times are used check barrel for gas build-up – this is very unlikely as normally a negative pressure is obtained when working and there is a slight inrush of air when the end caps are removed. However, a gas build up could push the end caps off so be alert to this and check by lifting the side of the cap to reduce pressure.

Work Items with Holes/Threads/Assemblies
Many of the items you will be cleaning will have holes and crevices in them that the compounds will explore when in use. If any of the items have blind holes the compounds (steel pins are especially prone to this) will work their way in and may be very difficult to remove. Insert a plug in to the hole if you expect problems. If the item is threaded it is possible that the thread form may be altered very slightly, if the work is close tolerance protect vulnerable parts as necessary. If you put an assembled item in the barrel it will almost certainly be dismantled by the tumbling action!

Other Barrelling Compounds
Apart from the compounds we have described there are many others that are used for specialist work, for instance sawdust, nylon pellets and wood fragments are used. For cleaning cartridge cases prior to reloading finely broken walnut shells can be used.

Important Initial Operating Tips
When you first use the machine you will probably feel the belt is far too loose, this is not so, it is essential that it runs as loose as possible without slipping and every machine is carefully adjusted and test run. If you tighten it up you can badly damage the motor and rob the machine of power – it MUST be loose. You may also suspect the machine runs rather hot to the touch, again this is a design feature and providing you can comfortably hold your hand on it there is nothing amiss. Do not however place the machine inside a box as it is essential that air can flow around it. We advise placing it on an old tray as this makes any cleaning far easier. One point you will notice is that the barrel will almost certainly move along the rollers until it touches one end of the machine – this is nothing to worry about – you will see there is a stop which the barrel will gently rub against. It is little use trying to tilt the machine in an attempt to stop this barrel movement.

Oiling and Maintenance
The machine is oiled when it leaves our workshops and can be used immediately. However, it will need lubrication whilst in use, proceed as follows:-

EVERY WEEK Apply one drop of oil to the steel shafts of the rollers where they pass through the plastic/brass bearing blocks. This is most important as the most common cause of problems with the barrelling machines of this design is a tight roller which robs the barrel of power.

EVERY MONTH Apply one drop of oil to the motor shaft where it protrudes through the side of the machine (2/3lb) – this will run into the motor bearing. Use motor car grade oil for oiling this machine, lighter grades are not suitable.  

Problem Solving
If barrel does not rotate:
1       Dry thoroughly rollers & barrel
2       If glazed rub lightly with sandpaper
3       Ensure no oil on rollers or barrel
4       Check barrel is not under-loaded or over-loaded

If belt slips:

1       Remove, wash, de-grease, dry thoroughly and replace
2       Replace if worn. Do not tighten

Out of balance barrels:

If barrels are overloaded or very irregular shaped items are being processed it is possible the heavy items will catch on the internal paddles when the barrel rotates, the load on one side will unbalance the barrel and it will not rotate properly. Either reduce the work load or if it is essential that the item is processed it may be worth trying a barrel without paddles which we can supply. The proportion of compounds may then need adjusting for optimum results. Incidentally, a very large number of these machines are used for polishing stones using silicon carbide grits – however the barrel construction is altered in that they have no internal paddles as the action is somewhat different. If you want to use this machine for polishing stones contact us for details on grits, barrels, etc.

For further advice or supplies please contact us at:

Beach Lapidary Ltd 
9 Leigh Road
Cobham
Surrey KT11 2LF
Email: beachlapidary@outlook.com

THESE machines will give excellent results if used correctly and with intelligence – PLEASE read these instructions carefully and save them for future use. Your tumbler should arrive with a THREE-PIN plug already attached.

Select stones that are generally 1” diameter or smaller, one or two larger stones may be polished in a load that consists primarily of smaller stones. To open the long life barrel push either end cap off with your thumbs. When new they are sometimes tight, but if you immerse the barrel in hot water then the end cap can be easily removed. Before putting the end caps back onto the barrel leave them to sit in hot water for a couple of minutes. This will soften the end caps and make them easier to push on. As they cool they will create a tight fit around the barrel. When replacing them ensure you have all the surplus air out of the barrel lifting one side with your fingers as you press the centre of the cap with your thumbs – you will hear the air hiss out. Make absolutely sure the caps are on properly and as far as they will go.

THIS IS MOST IMPORTANT. If your barrel is leaking it is probably because you have put the end caps on incorrectly.

If your machine is designed to carry the large capacity rubber barrels, the following notes apply;

When fitting the rubber lid, ensure that the groove engages all the way round. When opening, the pressure ring maybe rolled down the barrel, instead of being removed completely. Squeezing one side of the barrel assists with opening – DO NOT use a sharp instrument.

STEP ONE Fill barrel ¾ full with stones and shake to settle. DO NOT USE LESS, it will not work as there is no tumbling action unless the barrel is filled sufficiently. Add water to just over the top of the stones and one heaped tablespoon of coarse silicon carbide grit for the 1 ½ lb barrel (two for a 3lb barrel and three for a 5lb barrel). For this step 60-100 grade grit is most suitable. Run the machine for a few days and nights while occasionally examining the stones. Fairly smooth pebbles might need only about three days to become nicely rounded while very jagged ones may need ten or more days running and the grit topping up to get the same effect – seven days is a reasonable average.   When satisfied proceed to:

STEP TWO (Optional) Medium Grind – 220 Grit Thoroughly clean the stones and barrel by removing both ends. Proceed as before using 220 silicon carbide. It should only be necessary to run this grade for about 5-6 days.

STEP THREE Thoroughly clean stones and barrel by removing both end caps, washing carefully. Proceed as before using the same proportions of grit and water but this time use 300-400 grit silicon carbide. Please note this stage is very significant and determines the final polish, it is VITAL you do not cut it short. Allow at least seven days and do not top up with fresh grit as this will re-roughen the stones. Each day on this stage imparts a smoother finish as the grit breaks down and progressively smoothes the stones making it far simpler when proceeding with;

STEP FOUR Very, very thoroughly clean the stones and barrel. It would be useful to keep one barrel to be used specifically for polishing only, because of the difficulty of cleaning grits completely from the sides of the barrel. Additional barrels may be purchased separately from our catalogue. Examine the stones very carefully and make sure that they are very smooth. Discard any stones that are badly cracked or have jagged edges – they can be re-tumbled with your next load.

Repeat steps as before using similar amount of water but 1½ level tablespoons of zinc oxide instead of grit. If the barrel has been cleaned properly and the previous steps carried out correctly seven days running should produce gleaming gems or pebbles. Please note that these proportions refer to a 1½ lb barrel, adjust as needed.

Warning: - Do not put any of the resulting slurry down the sink – it is inclined to set solid!

This basically is all tumble polishing consists of but we strongly advise you to read on, the following comments are based on years of experience and assisting users to get the best possible results – it can only help you to succeed.

Important Initial Operating Tips
When you first use the machine you will probably feel the belt is far too loose, this is not so, it is essential that is runs as loose as possible without slipping and every machine is carefully adjusted and test run. If you tighten it up, you can badly damage the motor and rob the machine of power – it MUST be loose. You may also suspect that the machine runs rather hot to the touch, again this is a design feature and providing you can comfortably hold your hand on it there is nothing amiss. Do not, however, place the machine inside a box as it is essential that air can flow around it. We advise placing it on an old tray as this makes any cleaning far easier. One other point you will notice is that the barrel will almost certainly move along the rollers until it touches one end of the machine – this is nothing to worry about – you will see there is a stop which the barrel will gently rub against. It is little use trying to tilt the machine to stop this barrel movement.

Oiling and Maintenance

The machine is oiled when it leaves our workshops and can be used immediately. However, it will need lubrication while in use. Proceed as follows:

EVERY WEEK:  Apply one drop of oil to the steel shafts on the rollers where they pass through the plastic bearing blocks.

EVERY MONTH: Apply one drop of oil to the motor shaft where it protrudes through the side of the machine – this will run into the motor bearing. Also if the barrel seems to be rubbing rather hard against the stop at either end of the machine apply one drop of oil to the stop.

TYPE OF OIL:   As you can appreciate this machine does a lot of hard work and it needs a fairly substantial oil. We advise the types used in car engines as it is better able to cope with the bearing loads. However, if you have only the thinner cycle or sewing machine oils these can be used for short runs.

Problem Solving
The tumbler has been tested and should be trouble free but to ensure successful operation you must ensure the rollers turn absolutely freely, never use less stones if the tumbler appears hesitant to run but check all the bearings, a too light load may glaze the rollers and barrel through slippage – you will then need to lightly sand them with coarse sandpaper. Do not get oil on the rollers. Excessive belt wear can be caused by a faulty belt (beyond our control) or pulleys knocked out of alignment, the pulleys can be gently prised into line. Always realise that although the machine has ample power it cannot operate if the bearings are locked solid with grit – KEEP IT CLEAN – remove plug from mains when cleaning.

IF your trouble persists please read the instructions again very carefully. It is almost certain that the problem is trivial and can be solved with a few minutes thought – the most common problem we have Is tumblers that have had their belts tightened, robbing the motor of power and rollers that are not spinning freely – if either roller is tight it is equivalent to driving a car with the hand brake on!

For further advice or supplies please contact us at:

Beach Lapidary Ltd
9 Leigh Road
Cobham
Surrey KT11 2LF
Email: beachlapidary@outlook.com

THESE machines will give excellent results if used correctly and with intelligence – PLEASE read these instructions carefully and save them for future use. Your tumbler should arrive with a THREE-PIN plug already attached.

Select stones that are generally 1” diameter or smaller, one or two larger stones may be polished in a load that consists primarily of smaller stones. To open the long life barrel push either end cap off with your thumbs. When new they are sometimes tight, but if you immerse the barrel in hot water then the end cap can be easily removed. Before putting the end caps back onto the barrel leave them to sit in hot water for a couple of minutes. This will soften the end caps and make them easier to push on. As they cool they will create a tight fit around the barrel. When replacing them ensure you have all the surplus air out of the barrel lifting one side with your fingers as you press the centre of the cap with your thumbs – you will hear the air hiss out. Make absolutely sure the caps are on properly and as far as they will go.

THIS IS MOST IMPORTANT. If your barrel is leaking it is probably because you have put the end caps on incorrectly.

If your machine is designed to carry the large capacity rubber barrels, the following notes apply;

When fitting the rubber lid, ensure that the groove engages all the way round. When opening, the pressure ring maybe rolled down the barrel, instead of being removed completely. Squeezing one side of the barrel assists with opening – DO NOT use a sharp instrument.

STEP ONE Fill barrel ¾ full with stones and shake to settle. DO NOT USE LESS, it will not work as there is no tumbling action unless the barrel is filled sufficiently. Add water to just over the top of the stones and one heaped tablespoon of coarse silicon carbide grit for the 1 ½ lb barrel (two for a 3lb barrel and three for a 5lb barrel). For this step 60-100 grade grit is most suitable. Run the machine for a few days and nights while occasionally examining the stones. Fairly smooth pebbles might need only about three days to become nicely rounded while very jagged ones may need ten or more days running and the grit topping up to get the same effect – seven days is a reasonable average.   When satisfied proceed to:

STEP TWO (Optional) Medium Grind – 220 Grit Thoroughly clean the stones and barrel by removing both ends. Proceed as before using 220 silicon carbide. It should only be necessary to run this grade for about 5-6 days.

STEP THREE Thoroughly clean stones and barrel by removing both end caps, washing carefully. Proceed as before using the same proportions of grit and water but this time use 300-400 grit silicon carbide. Please note this stage is very significant and determines the final polish, it is VITAL you do not cut it short. Allow at least seven days and do not top up with fresh grit as this will re-roughen the stones. Each day on this stage imparts a smoother finish as the grit breaks down and progressively smoothes the stones making it far simpler when proceeding with;

STEP FOUR Very, very thoroughly clean the stones and barrel. It would be useful to keep one barrel to be used specifically for polishing only, because of the difficulty of cleaning grits completely from the sides of the barrel. Additional barrels may be purchased separately from our catalogue. Examine the stones very carefully and make sure that they are very smooth. Discard any stones that are badly cracked or have jagged edges – they can be re-tumbled with your next load.

Repeat steps as before using similar amount of water but 1½ level tablespoons of zinc oxide instead of grit. If the barrel has been cleaned properly and the previous steps carried out correctly seven days running should produce gleaming gems or pebbles. Please note that these proportions refer to a 1½ lb barrel, adjust as needed.

Warning: - Do not put any of the resulting slurry down the sink – it is inclined to set solid!

This basically is all tumble polishing consists of but we strongly advise you to read on, the following comments are based on years of experience and assisting users to get the best possible results – it can only help you to succeed.

Important Initial Operating Tips
When you first use the machine you will probably feel the belt is far too loose, this is not so, it is essential that is runs as loose as possible without slipping and every machine is carefully adjusted and test run. If you tighten it up, you can badly damage the motor and rob the machine of power – it MUST be loose. You may also suspect that the machine runs rather hot to the touch, again this is a design feature and providing you can comfortably hold your hand on it there is nothing amiss. Do not, however, place the machine inside a box as it is essential that air can flow around it. We advise placing it on an old tray as this makes any cleaning far easier. One other point you will notice is that the barrel will almost certainly move along the rollers until it touches one end of the machine – this is nothing to worry about – you will see there is a stop which the barrel will gently rub against. It is little use trying to tilt the machine to stop this barrel movement.

Oiling and Maintenance

The machine is oiled when it leaves our workshops and can be used immediately. However, it will need lubrication while in use. Proceed as follows:

EVERY WEEK:  Apply one drop of oil to the steel shafts on the rollers where they pass through the plastic bearing blocks.

EVERY MONTH: Apply one drop of oil to the motor shaft where it protrudes through the side of the machine – this will run into the motor bearing. Also if the barrel seems to be rubbing rather hard against the stop at either end of the machine apply one drop of oil to the stop.

TYPE OF OIL:   As you can appreciate this machine does a lot of hard work and it needs a fairly substantial oil. We advise the types used in car engines as it is better able to cope with the bearing loads. However, if you have only the thinner cycle or sewing machine oils these can be used for short runs.

Problem Solving
The tumbler has been tested and should be trouble free but to ensure successful operation you must ensure the rollers turn absolutely freely, never use less stones if the tumbler appears hesitant to run but check all the bearings, a too light load may glaze the rollers and barrel through slippage – you will then need to lightly sand them with coarse sandpaper. Do not get oil on the rollers. Excessive belt wear can be caused by a faulty belt (beyond our control) or pulleys knocked out of alignment, the pulleys can be gently prised into line. Always realise that although the machine has ample power it cannot operate if the bearings are locked solid with grit – KEEP IT CLEAN – remove plug from mains when cleaning.

IF your trouble persists please read the instructions again very carefully. It is almost certain that the problem is trivial and can be solved with a few minutes thought – the most common problem we have Is tumblers that have had their belts tightened, robbing the motor of power and rollers that are not spinning freely – if either roller is tight it is equivalent to driving a car with the hand brake on!

For further advice or supplies please contact us at:

Beach Lapidary Ltd
9 Leigh Road
Cobham
Surrey KT11 2LF
Email: beachlapidary@outlook.com